It will take 80 more years…

It will take 80 more years for No Child Left Behind to close the achievement gap.

Sean Reardon, Stanford University Professor of Education, comment (October 4, 2012 INVALSI Accountability Conference in Rome, Italy) based on his latest research on achievement gaps in the United States.

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Categories: Accountability, High-Stakes Testing

Author:Julian Vasquez Heilig

Julian Vasquez Heilig is currently an Associate Professor of Educational Policy and Planning and African and African Diaspora Studies (by courtesy) at the University of Texas at Austin.

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  1. Race and NCLB Waivers: Moving Around the Chairs? | Cloaking Inequity - November 25, 2012

    [...] first-order changes. Has NCLB (as arguably a second-order change) improved the achievement gap? I mentioned on Cloaking Inequity last month a new paper by Sean Reardon, a Stanford Professor, presented at an [...]

  2. Walking Away From High Stakes Tests, A Noble Lie | Cloaking Inequity - May 20, 2013

    […] I mentioned on Cloaking Inequity an academic paper about NAEP testing pre and post-NCLB by Sean Reardon, a Stanford Professor, presented at an Accountability conference in Rome a few months ago. He found our national NAEP improvement was more rapid prior to the implementation of NCLB. Furthermore, high-stakes tests have only inched us towards closing the achievement gap. At the rate of nationwide improvement we have seen over the past decade on the NAEP and state-mandated criterion-referenced tests, he found it will take us 80 more years to close the achievement gap. Remember with much ado that Bush and Kennedy said the achievement gaps would be closed by NCLB in 2014? It will not happen. What was Texas’, the birthplace of NCLB, response to this failure? We have doubled down on high-stakes exams. For example, we now require 15 exams to graduate from high school— the most in the nation. […]

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